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Method and Morals in Constitutional Economics Essays in Honor of James M. Buchanan (Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy)

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Published by Springer .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Ethics & Moral Philosophy,
  • Political economy,
  • Politics/International Relations,
  • Economics - Theory,
  • Economic History,
  • Public Policy - Economic Policy,
  • Economic Policy,
  • Economic Theory,
  • Business & Economics,
  • Business / Economics / Finance,
  • Economics - General,
  • United States,
  • Economics,
  • Buchanan,
  • Business & Economics / Economics / General,
  • Constitution,
  • Methods,
  • Moral and ethical aspects,
  • Buchanan, James M,
  • Economists,
  • Development - Economic Development,
  • Political aspects

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsGeoffrey Brennan (Editor), Hartmut Kliemt (Editor), Robert D. Tollison (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages569
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL9404120M
ISBN 103540419705
ISBN 109783540419709

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Method and Morals in Constitutional Economics Essays in Honor of James M. Buchanan. Get this from a library! Method and morals in constitutional economics: essays in honor of James M. Buchanan. [James M Buchanan; Geoffrey Brennan; Hartmut Kliemt; Robert D Tollison;]. Method and morals in constitutional economics: essays in honor of James M. Buchanan / Author: Geoffrey Brennan, Hartmut Kliemt, Robert D. Tollison (eds.) Publication info: Berlin ; New York: Springer-Verlag, c Format: Book. This book contains a range of essays on topics in the emerging field of "constitutional political economy". This field of enquiry is strongly associated with the name of James M. Buchanan whose research program has been the point of departure for this field.

Method and morals in constitutional economics: essays in honor of James M. Buchanan. To Help or Not to Help: The Samaritan's Dilemma Revisited.- Constitutional Economics and Ethics - On the Relation Between Self-Interest and Morality.- name\/a> \" Method and morals in constitutional economics: essays in honor of James M. Abstract. Fundamental to the economic approach to human behavior is the notion that people are motivated by self-interest in the sense that, if faced with a choice among alternative courses of action, they do what, in their view, best serves their own interests. Ethics, on the other hand, is based on the idea that there exist rules of moral conduct, Cited by: The linking theme of the essays in The Economics and the Ethics of Constitutional Order is the continuing relevance of Adam Smith’s ideas to issues emerging in the s – issues that have gained a new immediacy since the revolutionary events of Law, Economics, and Morality examines the possibility of combining economic methodology and deontological morality through explicit and direct incorporation of moral constraints into economic by:

Constitutional economics has been characterized as a practical approach to apply the tools of economics to constitutional matters. For example, a major concern of every nation is the proper allocation of available national economic and financial resources. The moral reading therefore brings political morality into the heart of constitutional law.1 But political morality is inherently uncertain and controversial, so any system of government that makes such principles part of its law must decide whose interpretation and understanding will be authoritative. In the American system judges—ultimately the justices of the Supreme Court—now have that authority, and the moral reading of the Constitution . There are certain moral values, such as concern for people, empathy, and kindness that are important in setting research priorities in science and in determining the uses of science. There is a need to incorporate these humanitarian values into the science and technology spheres, while maintaining and reinforcing the intrinsic values of science. Legislatures are better equipped than courts for deliberating and decision-making in regard to the kinds of factual and moral issues that arise in constitutional rights cases. The book concludes by considering the implications of comparative institutional capacity for constitutional design.